Topic: Duvets

Moisture Control in Mattresses and Bedding

Moisture control in mattresses and bedding.

Often overlooked by traditional manufacturers, moisture control in mattresses and bedding is probably the most important factor in creating a successful sleep environment.

When we sleep we perspire.  If that moisture remains next to our body we get clammy and hot.  Often to alleviate this issue we will throw off the blankets causing the moisture to evaporate quickly and cooling us so fast we get a chill.  Then we repeat the process over and over destroying any hope of a decent night sleep.

To ensure the comfort of our mattress and bedding products we use two natural fibres – Wool and Alpaca.  I will expand on Alpaca later but first let’s look at why wool is great for moisture control.  Wool will continue to feel dry even when it has absorbed 30% – 50% of its weight in moisture.  Capillary action (wicking) moves the moisture along the fibres and away from your body.  Wool has a very fast drying rate so it releases the moisture that has been drawn away from you into the air keeping you warm and dry; not hot and sweaty.  Alpaca’s fibre is hollow and it works like wool but even better with faster drying and better capillary action.  It does not contain lanolin which we love for its antibacterial and anti-dust mite properties so we use Alpaca in pillows and duvets, blended with 30% to 50% wool.

In closing, research with tell you there are many synthetic wicking fibres on the market today.  They are used in sportswear and some traditional mattresses and show excellent capillary action. Unfortunately tests show they do not offer the quick drying ability of wool and also have the problem of trapping fats and bacteria in the fibre pores resulting in odour.  Most of us have purchased these high tech garments and have been stunned by the seemingly impossible to remove smell after just a few workouts.  Manufacturers combat this problem by adding even more chemicals to combat the odour – something none of us need in our chemical soaked environment.  This is why we have no doubt Wool and Alpaca are the best fibres for moisture control in mattresses and bedding.

Dormio Introduces Alpaca Bedding

Duvets, mattress pads and pillows

As warm as a down duvet but less fill is needed to keep you warm so you won’t get hot and sweaty underneath. Alpaca fibre duvets are a great alternative for those who cannot tolerate down.

Why Alpaca Wool?
Because it is warmer, stronger, lighter and cleaner than any other product. It is believed to be the best possible filling available today to provide you with a warm, comfortable, healthy and stress free sleep.

An alpaca fibre duvet will absorb up to 35% of its weight in moisture, keeping you dry and comfortable while you sleep.
The fibre is grown without herbicides in a stress free environment and the animals are not dipped in pesticide baths. No chemicals, dyes or bleaches have been used during the processing. This fibre does not contain lanolin or grease. This porous, naturally dry and clean fill prevents dust mites and other allergens from settling in.

Made in Canada eh…… The work shop is located in the Monashee Mountains of BC in the little town of Cherryville.  The office faces farmer’s fields and at any given time there could be cows, horses and many deer roaming around. Sounds Canadian! The fibre used is usually from the underbellies and legs of the alpacas, which is most hollow and the most insulating.

General info on alpaca fleece………

Alpaca fleece is the natural fibre harvested from an alpaca. It is light weight or heavy weight, depending on how it is spun. It is soft, durable, luxurious and silky natural fibre. While similar to sheep’s wool, it is warmer, not prickly, and has no lanolin. Alpaca is naturally water-repellent and difficult to ignite. Huacaya, an alpaca that grows soft spongy fiber has natural crimp, thus making a naturally elastic yarn well-suited for knitting. Suri has far less crimp and thus is a better fit for woven goods. The designer Armani has used Suri alpaca to fashion Men’s and Women’s suits. Alpaca fleece is made into various products, from very simple and inexpensive garments made by the aboriginal communities to sophisticated, industrially made and expensive products such as suits. In the United States, groups of smaller alpaca breeders have banded together to create “fiber co-ops,” in order to make the manufacture of alpaca fiber products less expensive.

Types of Alpacas

Suri Alpaca

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are two types of alpaca: Huacaya (which produce a dense, soft, crimpy sheep-like fiber), and the Suri (with silky pencil-like locks, resembling dread-locks but without matted fibers). Suris are prized for their longer and silkier fibers, and estimated to make up between 19-20% of the North American Alpaca population. Since its import into the United States, the number of Suri alpacas has grown substantially and become more color diverse. The Suri is thought to be rarer, most likely because the breed was reserved for royalty during Incan times. It is often said that Suris are less cold hardy than Huacaya, but both breeds are successfully raised in more extreme climates than those in which they were developed in South America.

History

Alpacas have been bred in South America for thousands of years. Vivunas were first domesticated and bred into alpacas by the ancient tribes of the Andean highlands of Peru, Argentina, Chile and Bolivia. Two thousand year old Paracas Textiles are thought to include alpaca fibre. In recent years alpacas have also been exported to other countries. In countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand breeders shear their animals annually, weigh the fleeces and test them for fineness. With the resulting knowledge they are able to breed heavier-fleeced animals with finer fiber. Fleece weights vary, with the top stud males reaching annual shear weights up to 7 kg total fleece and 3 kg good quality fleece. The discrepancy in weight is because an alpaca has Guard hair which is often removed before spinning.

The Amerindians of Peru used this fiber in the manufacture of many styles of fabrics for thousands of years before its introduction into Europe as a commercial product. The alpaca was a crucial component of ancient life in the Andes, as it provided not only warm clothing but also meat.

A pair of Huacaya alpacas near an Inca burial site in Peru

 

 

 

 

 

There is a cross between alpaca and llama that is a true hybrid in every sense  producing a material placed upon the Liverpool market under the name Huarizio. Crosses between the alpaca and vicu have not proved satisfactory. Current attempts to cross these two breeds are underway at farms in the US. According to the Alpaca Owners and Breeders Association, alpacas are now being bred in the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, UK, and numerous other places.

In recent years, interest in alpaca fiber clothing has surged, perhaps partly because alpaca ranching has a reasonably low impact on the environment. Individual U.S. farms are producing finished alpaca products like hats, scarves, and footwarmers. Outdoor sports enthusiasts recognize that its lighter weight and better warmth provides them more comfort in colder weather, so outfitters such as R.E.I and others are beginning to stock more alpaca products. Using an alpaca and wool blend such as Merino is common to the alpaca fiber industry in order to improve processing and the qualities of the final product.

Fibre structure

In physical structure, alpaca fiber is somewhat akin to hair, being very glossy. Alpaca fiber is similar to that of merino wool fiber, and alpaca yarns tend to be stronger than wool yarns. The heel hole that appears in wool socks or in elbows of wool sweaters is nonexistent in similar alpaca garments. In processing, slivers lack fiber cohesion and single alpaca rovings lack strength. Blend these together and the durability is increased several times over. More twisting is necessary, especially in Suri, and this can reduce a yarn’s softness.

The alpaca has a very fine and light fleece. It does not retain water, is thermal even when wet and can resist the solar radiation effectively. These characteristics guarantee the animals a permanent and appropriate coat to fight against the extreme changes of temperature. This fiber offers the same protection to humans. Alpacas as animals are soft on the environment, making alpaca a truly green textile.

Alpaca fiber contains also microscopic airbags that make possible the manufacture of light textiles as well as different kinds of clothing. The cells of the central core may contract or disappear, forming air pockets which assist insulation.

Quality

Good quality alpaca fiber is approximately 18 to 25 micrometers in diameter. Finer fleeces, ones with a smaller diameter, are preferred, and thus are more expensive. As an alpaca gets older the width of the fibers gets thicker, at between 1 µm and 5 µm per year. This is often caused by over nutrition; if fed too much nutritious food the animal doesn’t get fat, instead the fiber gets thicker.

As with all fleece-producing animals, quality varies from animal to animal, and some alpacas produce fiber which is less than ideal. Fiber and conformation are the two most important factors in determining an alpaca’s value.

Alpacas come in many shades from a true-blue black through browns-black, browns, fawns, white, silver-greys, and rose-greys. However, white is predominant, because of selective breeding: the white fiber can be dyed in the largest ranges of colors. In South America, the preference is for white as they generally have better fleece than the darker-colored animals. This is because the dark colors had been all but bred out of the animals. The demand for darker fiber sprung up in the United States and elsewhere, however in order to reintroduce the colors, the quality of the darker fiber has decreased slightly. Breeders have been diligently working on breeding dark animals with exceptional fiber, and much progress has been made in these areas over the last 5-7 years.

Dormio Organic Beds…naturally better

Best selection of natural and organic quality mattresses and bedding in the Toronto area!

 

General Info on Wool Duvets

Wool is often called the miracle fibre – a wonderful insulator, excellent at moisture control, naturally flame resistant, highly resilient and many other good things.

For thousands of years man has had a beneficial relationship with this unique fibre, but only in more recent times has science discovered why wool is such a miracle fibre and why it is the perfect choice for bedding products. The secret is in each wool fibre.

Moisture Control

The core of each wool fibre is very absorbent – up to 30% of its weight in moisture. By comparison cotton absorbs 8% and most synthetics as low as 2%.  In fact wool is the most hydrophilic (able to absorb moisture) of all natural fibres.  The wool fibre is unique in that it then releases this moisture slowly through evaporation helping the sleeper stay warmer in winter and cooler in summer, and eliminating dampness in the bedding.

Natural Temperature Control

As wool fibres release absorbed moisture, heat is given off.  In fact, a single gram of wool gives off 27 calories of heat when it goes from wet to dry.

Naturally Non Allergenic

The keratin in wool is the same protein as in nails and hair.  Dust mites – a leading cause of allergies – prefer a damp, not dry location, and the scales which cover each wool fibre help further create an inhospitable environment.

How to choose a wool duvet

The wool fill should be hi bulk (trapping lots of air for insulation), resilient and light in weight. A flat, heavy wool duvet indicates poor quality wool that will not insulate well.

The cover should be soft, breathable and allow the wool fill to contour the sleeper’s position. If the cover is stiff, rustles or is hard to breathe through, it means the cover is probably down proof cotton which eliminates wool’s moisture controlling benefits.

Dormio Organic Beds has a huge selection of natural or organic Duvets, we have organic, all season, winter summer and washable. It’s an amazing selection and our knowledgeable is here to help you make the right choice.

 

Making Duvets Video

 


 

Dormio Organic Beds…naturally better

Best selection of natural and organic quality mattresses and bedding in the Toronto area!