Topic: Cotton

Moisture Control in Mattresses and Bedding

Moisture control in mattresses and bedding.

Often overlooked by traditional manufacturers, moisture control in mattresses and bedding is probably the most important factor in creating a successful sleep environment.

When we sleep we perspire.  If that moisture remains next to our body we get clammy and hot.  Often to alleviate this issue we will throw off the blankets causing the moisture to evaporate quickly and cooling us so fast we get a chill.  Then we repeat the process over and over destroying any hope of a decent night sleep.

To ensure the comfort of our mattress and bedding products we use two natural fibres – Wool and Alpaca.  I will expand on Alpaca later but first let’s look at why wool is great for moisture control.  Wool will continue to feel dry even when it has absorbed 30% – 50% of its weight in moisture.  Capillary action (wicking) moves the moisture along the fibres and away from your body.  Wool has a very fast drying rate so it releases the moisture that has been drawn away from you into the air keeping you warm and dry; not hot and sweaty.  Alpaca’s fibre is hollow and it works like wool but even better with faster drying and better capillary action.  It does not contain lanolin which we love for its antibacterial and anti-dust mite properties so we use Alpaca in pillows and duvets, blended with 30% to 50% wool.

In closing, research with tell you there are many synthetic wicking fibres on the market today.  They are used in sportswear and some traditional mattresses and show excellent capillary action. Unfortunately tests show they do not offer the quick drying ability of wool and also have the problem of trapping fats and bacteria in the fibre pores resulting in odour.  Most of us have purchased these high tech garments and have been stunned by the seemingly impossible to remove smell after just a few workouts.  Manufacturers combat this problem by adding even more chemicals to combat the odour – something none of us need in our chemical soaked environment.  This is why we have no doubt Wool and Alpaca are the best fibres for moisture control in mattresses and bedding.

Organic Pima Cotton

What is Pima cotton?

Pima cotton is the name for extra-long staple (ELS) cotton grown in the U.S., Australia, Peru and in very limited production in a few other locations around the world.  It is grown in select areas where the cotton can benefit from a long growing season in a hot, dry climate.  Its production costs are much higher than upland cotton costs in the same area.

The name was given to the ELS cotton being grown in the Southwest U.S. in about 1910. It was renamed to honour the Pima Indians who were growing the cotton for the USDA in Sacaton, Arizona, where the government’s Pima breeding program was being conducted, but its origins date back to its cultivation in Peru.

The difference between Pima cotton and common upland cotton are staple length and strength.  Cotton is considered to be Pima if its fibres are an inch and 3/8 or longer.  Upland cotton typically ranges from 7/8 inch to an inch and 1/4.  Also, the strength and uniformity measurements are considerably higher in Pima cotton.

What’s the difference between Pima and Egyptian cotton?

All cotton grown in Egypt is “Egyptian” cotton, but it is not all ELS cotton.  Egypt is one of the largest producers of ELS cotton in the world, but it consumes much of what it produces. The majority of what it exports is long staple cotton, not ELS (Pima) cotton.  However, the description “Egyptian cotton” conjures in the mind of many consumers the image of the very finest and longest cotton in the world. Egypt does produce and sell some of the best ELS cotton in the world, but it amounts to less than 15 percent of annual global ELS cotton exports, and less than 35 percent of Egyptian cotton exports. Additionally, Egypt currently does not produce any certified organic ELS cotton.

What’s the benefit of Pima Cotton?

Its fineness and longer staple length makes Pima a premium cotton fibre. Because of the fineness of organic pima cotton, more fibres can be spun into a yarn of a given count, which will enhance the feel, softness and drapeability of a fabric.

Our certified organic Pima cotton, found in all our premium products, is cultivated in a centuries-old traditional, cooperative manner in the Canete and Chincha valleys found high in the Peruvian Andes. No defoliants, herbicides, pesticides, or synthetic fertilizers are used to control plant growth, fight pests or fertilize the crop. No synthetic chemicals are used in harvesting or manufacturing.

Dormio Premium Organic Duvet with Pima Cotton cover

Dormio Organic Beds…naturally better

Best selection of natural and organic quality mattresses and bedding in the Toronto area!

 

 

Organic cotton’s importance for a healthy planet

Here are some reasons why organic cotton production is important to the long-term health of the planet.

  • Cotton uses approximately 25% of the world’s insecticides and more than 10% of the pesticides (including herbicides, insecticides, and defoliants.). (Allan Woodburn)
  • Approximately 10% of all pesticides sold for use in U. S. agriculture were applied to cotton in 1997, the most recent year for which such data is publicly available. (ACPA)
  • Eighty-four million pounds of pesticides were sprayed on the 14.4 million acres of conventional cotton grown in the U.S. in 2000 (5.85 pounds/ acre), ranking cotton second behind corn in total amount of pesticides sprayed. (USDA)
  • Over 2.03 billion pounds of synthetic fertilizers were applied to conventional cotton the same year (142 pounds/acre), making cotton the fourth most heavily fertilized crop behind corn, winter wheat, and soybeans. (USDA)
  • The Environmental Protection Agency considers seven of the top 15 pesticides used on cotton in 2000 in the United States as “possible,” “likely,” “probable,” or “known” human carcinogens (acephate, dichloropropene, diuron, fluometuron, pendimethalin, tribufos, and trifluralin). (EPA)
  • In 1999, a work crew re-entered a cotton field about five hours after it was treated with tribufos and sodium chlorate (re-entry should have been prohibited for 24 hours). Seven workers subsequently sought medical treatment and five have had ongoing health problems. (California DPR)
  • It takes roughly one-third of a pound of chemicals (pesticides and fertilizers) to grow enough cotton for just one T-shirt. (SCP)

Cotton Ball

At Dormio Organic Beds, we offer a wide selection of organic cotton products, from mattresses to bedding products and also baby products.

Dormio Organic Beds…naturally better

Best selection of natural and organic quality mattresses and bedding in the Toronto area!